How to prepare for moving targets?

TaperPin

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What kind of lead do people use? How much movement is too much? How do you practice?

Antelope often walk around doing antelope things, being an antelope. Most of us that have hunted them any amount have had one walk over a slight rise never to be seen again.

Mule deer will often stop before going over a hill or when someone blows a cow call at them, but what about a slowly walking deer way out there?

 

Broz

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Typically I only shoot moving targets at matches. The Shooter app has a great lead option for moving targets if you know the target speed. We dial in the wind and hold the lead as you will be switching sides of the reticle. Surprising how well it works if you can keep up. Even at distances over 1K

Coyotes that are running full left or right I hold the lower part of the head or nose area. I really don't care where I hit them as long as I get a hit and then a follow up if needed.

Game animals I really try for a standing shot. I try to pick up on a feeding pattern. IE: two steps and feed etc. That has worked well if the animal has a pattern.

Yes you are correct. They do sometimes get over the hill. But I am just not comfortable enough with my skill set to try an actual leading shot at long range on game. But it sure would be a good skill set to improved and master if possible.
 

Willys

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I only shoot at moving deer/elk at distance if possibly wounded and look at ballistcs chart to get an idea. 3mph = 4.4fps so at 800 yards you need to lead walking animal over 4 feet.
 

TaperPin

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Typically I only shoot moving targets at matches. The Shooter app has a great lead option for moving targets if you know the target speed. We dial in the wind and hold the lead as you will be switching sides of the reticle. Surprising how well it works if you can keep up. Even at distances over 1K

Coyotes that are running full left or right I hold the lower part of the head or nose area. I really don't care where I hit them as long as I get a hit and then a follow up if needed.

Game animals I really try for a standing shot. I try to pick up on a feeding pattern. IE: two steps and feed etc. That has worked well if the animal has a pattern.

Yes you are correct. They do sometimes get over the hill. But I am just not comfortable enough with my skill set to try an actual leading shot at long range on game. But it sure would be a good skill set to improved and master if possible.
It does seem like a good skill to have, even if it’s only used to finish off a wounded animal. It’s a hard nut to crack - different animals have different walking speeds, the angle is always different, and a ballistics calculator takes too long.

This is a neat little trick timing the bullet TOF by speaking a word quickly.

My 6.5 PRC, 7 mag or 300 PRC rifles take right at 1/3 of a second for the bullet to make it 300 yards. It takes me right at 1/3 second to say the word “three” or the word “lead” quickly - any word that takes that amount of time and is easy to remember would work. As an animal’s chest passes a tree or bush I’ll say “lead” and note the amount of movement - that’s the lead for that animal moving at that speed at 300 yards. Of course if it’s not 300 yards some quick math is needed.

To find words that work for you, a simple stopwatch works well - just say a word 10 times and divide the time by 10.

This isn’t my video, but it shows an elk walking past a few bushes and trees to show what I’m describing (works better with no volume). The red line in the screen grab is what I come up with for lead - if this were 300 yards.

790B939C-A943-42B2-9D0F-8A8940DE32A9.jpeg

 

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